Preview: La Amazona vs. La Leona

by
Preview: La Amazona vs. La Leona

Preview: La Amazona vs. La Leona

by
Preview: La Amazona vs. La Leona

“We can get the job done and I believe the physical punishment is truly enough to get you mentally strong.” (Illustration: Angela Bermudez)
“I believe the physical punishment is truly enough,” said Hanna, “to get you mentally strong.” (Illustration: Angela Bermudez)

On Saturday, June 18, at Domo Jose Maria Vargas de la Guaira in Maiqueita, Venezuela, WBO World female junior middleweight champion Hanna “La Amazona” Gabriels (15-1-1, 10 KOs), from Alajuela, Costa Rica, defends her title against Katia “La Leona” Alvarino (8-2-1, 3 KOs), from Juan Lacaze, Colonia, Uruguay.

Also at stake is the vacant WBA World female super welterweight title.

Thirty-three-year-old Gabriels turned pro in her native Costa Rica in 2007. Two years later, in just her 10th fight, she won the vacant WBO World female welterweight title via fourth round knockout. In her next fight she moved up a division and won the vacant WBO World super welterweight strap.

“It’s been an honor for me to represent the WBO,” she said. “Unifying the title has always been one of my dreams and I am thankful that the WBO and WBA are allowing me this opportunity. Training in Las Vegas these last few months, I feel I have made tremendous improvement. I am feeling better than I have ever felt and can’t wait to show everyone that I am one of the very best female fighters in the world.”

“La Leona” at 5’11” is four inches taller than Gabriels. She is also three years younger. What she lacks is seasoning. The healthy female boxing scene in Argentina inspired Alvarino to turn pro in 2011 and this is her first shot at a world title.

Hanna Gabriels spoke with the BBC last year and revealed some of what makes her tick.

“Boxing has been for me the opportunity to better my quality of life, so I’m grateful to God when I get into the ring. It’s amazing that after the training and the effects that you make in the gym there’s people that comes to see every movement that you make—how smart you are, how you solve the problems that will come out, you have to make the right decision in a second.

“Boxing is a very, very demanding sport. Boxing is a risking sport. My preparation sometimes is very difficult. In Costa Rica there’s not much support, so my trainer works with the resources we have. Boxing is a part of my life. It’s part of me. We can get the job done and I believe the physical punishment is truly enough to get you mentally strong.”

Listen to BBC in conversation with Cecilia Braekus and Hanna Gabriels: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p02r3rgg

This article was penned by the author who is not related to the WBA and the statements, expressions or opinions referenced herein are that of the author alone and not the WBA.


Dr. Steelhammer Is Itching for a Fight

Dr. Steelhammer Is Itching for a Fight



McCaskill and Ryan ready for war in Orlando

McCaskill and Ryan ready for war in Orlando

Jessica McCaskill and Sandy Ryan fulfilled the press conference before...

WBA Future of Colombian Boxing returns to Cuadrilátero Elite 

WBA Future of Colombian Boxing returns to Cuadrilátero Elite 

This Saturday a new edition of the Future of Colombian...

Batyrzhan Jukembayev won the North American intercontinental super lightweight belt

Batyrzhan Jukembayev won the North American intercontinental super lightweight belt

Kazakhstan boxer Batyrzhan Jukembayev defeated Argentina’s Hugo Roldan on Wednesday...